Category: Xataka Science Quiz

What do you think about the case of Diego Martínez Santos ?: The question of the week

One more Thursday, we bring you the question of the week to know your opinion. This week the case of Diego Martínez Santos, a young Galician physicist who received two news on the same day, one good and one bad, caught my attention. The good news was that he had been awarded by the European Society of Physics for being the best young European experimental physicist, thanks to his work on the LHCb experiment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
Can religion survive an alien contact? the question of the week
Can religion survive an alien contact? the question of the week
That Galileo suggested that the Earth is not the center of the Universe did not seem to affect the religions that did postulate it: they adapted. Nor does it seem that Charles Darwin succeeded when he suggested that we are not special creatures, but part of an evolutionary process. However, these findings, and in general the findings of science, could be preventing the entry of new proselytes.
What would you like us to talk about in Xataka Science? the question of the week
What would you like us to talk about in Xataka Science? the question of the week
Feedback with our readers is important in Xataka Science. Sometimes we receive messages that ask us to address certain issues or clarify certain concepts. Even that we throw down some pseudosciences. However, we have never seen how this process is done collaboratively.
Do you think that in science there is still a sexist bias? the question of the week
Do you think that in science there is still a sexist bias? the question of the week
Prejudice or discrimination based on sex or gender is called sexist bias. Due to the exclusively masculine formation of the new Greek government, the debate on sexism in all orders of power and also in the works has been put on the table again. While it must be borne in mind that, on average, men can perform a specific job better than a woman, and vice versa, to what extent do we know that this presumed advantage is due to the social trust that such stereotype receives or not?
Do you think that certain ideas can be ridiculed? the question of the week
Do you think that certain ideas can be ridiculed? the question of the week
Ultimately, in the wake of certain facts that are not worth remembering, he has put on the freedom of people to ridicule or befa other people's ideas or beliefs. That is to say, regardless of whether it might be in bad taste to act in this way, what is proposed is that such manifestations be prohibited (or it is even understood that someone reacts violently to them; even the Pope himself, champion of goodness and by turning the other cheek, he has admitted that if they mess with his mother he would give a host, and not those of consecrate).
The question of the week: What biographical film of scientists did you like the most?
The question of the week: What biographical film of scientists did you like the most?
Lately we are attending the coincidence in time of various biopics of scientists. Benedict Cumberbatch stars in The Imitation Game, which tells the life of Alan Turing. On the other hand Eddie Redmayne plays Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. Just a few weeks ago I also had the opportunity to see Flashes of Genius, which tells the legal odyssey of the Robert Kearns invention patent, which had the idea of ​​creating an intermittent windshield wiper, since before the windshield wipers were continuous and made vision difficult.
What science book would you recommend to a child? the question of the week
What science book would you recommend to a child? the question of the week
Scientific dissemination is a fine art that swings between rigor and entertainment. Only the great disseminators know how to mix both dimensions without squeaking either (or squeaking as little as possible). However, if the audience is made up of children, the thing can still become much more complicated, because the probability of not being understood or bored increases.
What has been your favorite science book of 2014? the question of the week
What has been your favorite science book of 2014? the question of the week
In Xataka Science we are always very aware of the news in the field of scientific dissemination books, and we maintain a section where we review all the books we read about it and that inspire us to write an article. That is why we ask you, now that this year is ending, that you tell us about the books that you have discovered, the books that you liked the most, the books that were recommended to you, the ones that you are most excited to start next year.
Do you think genes are more decisive than the environment? the question of the week
Do you think genes are more decisive than the environment? the question of the week
Although the Nature VS Nurture debate seems eternal (and irresolvable), we also want to hear your opinion about it. That is to say: if you consider that it is the genes or on the contrary the environment that determines who we are. Or maybe it is that the environment is also a product of genes? Why are we like this and not otherwise?
What recent scientific discovery has been the one that most moved you? the question of the week
What recent scientific discovery has been the one that most moved you? the question of the week
We live in a time when scientific and technical progress is so accelerated that, on occasion, we are not very aware of how the world is changing. Could anyone imagine Wikipedia just fifteen years ago? Or what would it mean to carry a smartphone? Or that we would land on the back of a comet?
What would you change about science education at school? the question of the week
What would you change about science education at school? the question of the week
There is still a lot of work for science to be considered culture. To know math is as important as knowing the life of Cervantes. So that an intellectual who in a public environment jokes about his ignorance in some scientific aspect ceases to be considered an intellectual. Perhaps one of the mistakes of this discrepancy lies in the way science is taught in school.
What do you think of the movie 'Interstellar'? the question of the week
What do you think of the movie 'Interstellar'? the question of the week
A few days ago the epic, almost Kubrickian, Interstellar, by Christopher Nolan was released. Away from the holes in the script, the chattering too grandiculoquent and a somewhat disappointing ending, Interstellar is probably the first film that addresses cosmological issues that we had only seen reflected in science fiction novels.
Does technology increase the labor supply or decrease it? the question of the week
Does technology increase the labor supply or decrease it? the question of the week
At different times in history, technology has destroyed the work fabric, but at the same time it has projected another different work fabric. For example, it happened in the Industrial Revolution. Now, however, it seems that automation has been taking out an important part of the labor sector for a few decades.
What science radio or podcast program do you recommend? the question of the week
What science radio or podcast program do you recommend? the question of the week
I particularly love filling my dead times with enriching distractions. The one of hours of car, shopping in the supermarket or long walks I have filled with music, but also of radio programs and podcast of the most diverse subjects. I know who even learned English with mp3 in their daily car traffic jams.
What science fiction movie do you think is more credible? the question of the week
What science fiction movie do you think is more credible? the question of the week
Finding credible science fiction novels is relatively straightforward. You just have to dig through the hard science fiction subgenre to find plausible explanations and a lot of scientific justification (in fact, most hard science fiction novels are written by scientists).
What do you think of the management of the Ebola crisis? the question of the week
What do you think of the management of the Ebola crisis? the question of the week
The media is monopolized by Ebola. The management of Ana Mato. The first case of infection outside of Africa. If the nursing assistant touched her face with the glove or did not. The convenience of sacrificing the Excalibur dog. The reason that the bodies of two infected were brought to Spain.
Are religion and science incompatible?
Are religion and science incompatible?
There are some authors who believe that the teaching of religion runs along a different path than the teaching of science and that, consequently, there is no conflict between the two. Others, however, argue that the two magisteries offer answers about reality, except that one magisterium offers them from the point of view of faith or authority, and the other through experimentation and falsifiable evidence.
Do you think the media should be regulated in science? the question of the week
Do you think the media should be regulated in science? the question of the week
The media are responsible for informing, but also for misinforming. When political, historical, criminalistic and other issues are addressed, the burden of opinion and interpretation is high, so that the demands on rigor are more porous. We all have in the spotlight some little rigorous means on these issues, but surely the followers of that medium also consider that our preferred medium is biased.
Can science and should contribute something about the abortion debate? the question of the week
Can science and should contribute something about the abortion debate? the question of the week
These days, the conditions under which women can have an abortion are being debated again, even if such practice must be carried out in any circumstance, to rebuild the reform of the Abortion Law promoted by the Minister of Justice, Alberto Ruiz-Gallardón . All contribute their moral vision of things, the pragmatic vision, social reality and even history, the laws of other countries.
What living person is changing the world more thanks to science? the question of the week
What living person is changing the world more thanks to science? the question of the week
Some are fascinated with Elon Musk, creator of Tesla, SpaceX and Segway, in the purest Tony Stark style of Iron Man. Others prefer to adhere to the utopian biotechnological vision of Craig Venter. There are also those who adore the visionary point of Nicholas Negroponte. Or Jimmy Wales and his democratization of knowledge thanks to Wikipedia.
What rare disease do you think requires more investment of resources? the question of the week
What rare disease do you think requires more investment of resources? the question of the week
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Prader Willi Syndrome, Moebius Syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ... There are between 5,000 and 7,000 known rare diseases, the vast majority of which are caused by genetic defects, which affect between 6% and 8% of the total population. Since 2008, on February 29, a "rare" day, World Rare Disease Day is celebrated in several countries of the world.